Spin: Priming

All the parts of the Spin are primed with white radiator lacquer.

Say what? Why prime an aircraft that is going to be covered in foil?

Yes, I can’t help it: I have to try my own ideas again. The Spin is going to be covered in transparent white and red, so the interior is going to be visible. And I’m not too happy with the colour contrasts of the different parts made from carbon fibre and wood, the scorch marks left from the laser cutting are hard to completely remove, too.

And that’s why I tasked myself with priming the construction before applying the covering with film.

What’s New?

Finally, there’s some progress to report. After a long interruption and some changes I’m back.

Let’s briefly graze the essentials: due to a move I relocated everything concerning my model railway to my father’s and a good friend’s of mine. Only my oldest LGB loco, a Stainz, is at my place and awaits reconfiguration as an accu-powered R/C loco.

The model aircraft flying had to lie dormant for a long time, too, but now I’m active again. I shelved building the Ka8b because I simply lack the time to cut every piece by hand. The existing parts are stored and it’s quite possible that I will continue the build. However it’s very unlikely to happen this year.

Instead, I purchased a small DLG kit.

New Construction Report: Ka8b

A prototypical Ka8b, the D-5727. Source: Wikimedia Foundation.

Today, I’d like to announce my new model aircraft building project: A Schleicher K 8b (or short: Ka8b) on a scale of 1 : 5.

She’s a one-seater soaring plane from the 1950s, and due to her simple, but rugged construction she’s still in service today, especially suitable for beginners making their first solo flights.
That sound a bit like me, doesn’t it…

Thermy 4: Project Cancelled

Sorry for the lack of updates. Today I’d like to announce that the project “semiscale-soaring plane based on Thermy 4” is cancelled.

With this project, I overstretched myself (again). The initial idea of a modified nose grew into a complete redesign of the fuselage… and the wings would benefit from some changes as well… I’m staying true to myself in tackling too big plans entirely too fast. The constant reader might remember my thoughts on new hobby priorities.

The fact is that I’m only starting to learn model aircraft construction. The Joyrider does well, but she suffers from design flaws because she was built planless by all accounts. And I really should build a proved soaring plane before trying to design one by myself.

As a repentant sinner I’ve chosen a new project as compensation. More on that shortly.

Joyrider: Banner Towing

The Joyrider cuts a fine figure.

A friend of mine visited on the weekend to get an opportunity for his son and himself to practice some R/C aircraft piloting. Needless to say, the prospect of having some interested folks around spurred me into getting the Joyrider into tip-top shape… and it gave me the opportunity to try and fulfil one of those wishes left over, as mentioned in my post about taking stock. That is: banner towing.

Joyrider: Taking Stock

After successfull test flight.

Since the Maiden Flight during Summer last year, the Joyrider has spent about one and a half hours in the air, while spending up to eight hours in the workshop and the rest of the time on shelf. It has been a rough ride, with many setbacks. However there’s a happy ending. Today, I’d like to take stock of what happened since the first flight tests.

Thermy 4: Planning the Nose

Based on the draft stringers the new frames for the cockpit come about.

Based on the design variations, I’m moving on to the actual planning and start to blueprint the nose. If possible, it is supposed to give the aircraft a semiscale appearance and that means I basically have to start from scratch.

In order to create parts repetitively and precisely, the blueprinting is going to be computer-assisted. In theory I could draw on paper, scan the diagrams and print them. However, I would lack the 3D preview and applying adjustments is going to be much more time-consuming.